Tuesday, 18 August 2015

WEP entry August 2015. Spectacular Settings - Like Lantana



                                                 Like Lantana.

This is Australia. The place that I live. But not my "island home". That's at the far side of the planet. A green dot on the landscape. England. It is forever in my mind. Sometimes I go back. I feel complete. Effortlessly my self. For a while. Then I begin to long for dust and the cackle of kookaburras. Long for the sharp scent of eucalypt. For  shimmering heat waves on scorched earth. The secret, brooding silence of the bush. It calls to me.
So I come back. I sink fence posts into the ground and wonder if I'm desecrating sacred ground. I dig my roots deep into the rusty red soil. I turn my face to the brilliant blue of the sky. I am alien. An invader. Like lantana.

  

Many thanks to Denise and Yolanda for making it happen. To see more go to... 


POST THIS BADGE UNDER YOUR ENTRY 

Word count 130:FCA
 

38 comments:

  1. Hello Jenny!

    Welcome back to WEP! My first comment! And how lovely that it eulogises Australia. I can remember pulling lantana on our property on the Sunshine Coast. Pesky weed! I love the metaphor for your transplanted life on the other side of the world from where you began.

    Love 'I am alien. An invader. Like lantana.'

    Powerful words.

    If you're interested, read 'To a Migrant Girl' by Geoffrey Dutton. It reminded me of your sentiments--'Until you longed for dust storms and exploding trees.'

    Thank you so much for participating in WEP.

    Denise :-)

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    1. Hi Denise, it's so great to back! How can you not love this ancient place? Will check out 'To A Migrant Girl' for sure, thank you very much.

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  2. Jenny what a beautiful tribute to two such different places, I know the feeling. I miss the one place on earth I've ever felt at home, Alaska. The photographs you used to demonstrate your Spectacular Settings are breathtaking and the flowering Lantana – that pesky weed as Denise called it – lovely too.

    Thank you for your beautifully written contribution to the WEP.

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  3. Hi Yolanda, and thanks. I guess we are lucky to have two worlds to love. Never been to Alaska, but from the little I know, it is magnificent. Took the photos myself, some of the few that defied the odds and managed to shine. It's great to be back with WEP.

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  4. Oh yes. Australia is a harsh and unforgiving land. And so very beautiful. And the scent of the eucalyptus, and the warble of the magpie spell home to me.
    Thank you so much for this. And I envy you in having two homes...

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    1. I am lucky. Two countries of such great contrast too.

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  5. Australia reminds me of the Badlands of South Dakota, eerie, beautiful, and unforgivingly harsh. I am a transplant, too. Great post. I was there with your words. :-)

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    1. Hi fellow transplant. Badlands! What an awesome place name, conjures up all sorts of stuff. My stepfather always said that Queensland was very like Ohio. Maybe I'll see for myself one day. Hope so. Thanks very much for dropping by.

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  6. Excellent feel to your words. It's wonderful that you have two great loves. I live in NC and miss my Keys every day. I truly enjoyed reading.

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    1. Hi Robyn, lovely to have you hear. Sounds like you have to great loves too! Thanks for dropping by.

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  7. Reading this, I know that I could never be a successful transplant - I love my home too much. I'm more of an African Violet I suppose.
    I found your piece captivatingly short and sweet.

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    1. Ahh! That's gorgeous. I love African Violets. Thanks for popping in.

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  8. Love your picture and your feelings of being in one place while wanting to be in another. That 'weed' is quite pretty. I don't know much about the plant itself. A wise (?) person once said to me that a weed is only a flower growing in the wrong place!

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    1. Hey Sally, thanks for coming by. Lantana flowers are pretty and quite delicate, but the plant makes for a very dense, very tough shrub. The finches and wrens love them. Must agree that in its homeland lantana is probably a flower!

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  9. I like how the describes the differences in the places you call home. It's how such contrast can have the same "home" feeling to them. Thanks for sharing.

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  10. Hi Toinette, you are so right. I feel a deep and abiding love for both lands. It's just a shame they are so far apart! Thanks so much for coming by.

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  11. Wow, I love this post. Even though I dislike our Aussie summer immensely, there is something about such vivid descriptions of this wonderful land that gets me every time! I remember when I went on a long trip around the world, and finally got home, one of my friends from Sydney said, "So did you kiss the ground and then go and hug a gum tree?" It was a really intriguing notion to me. Gum trees are special!

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    1. Hi Trisha, thanks for coming by. Must agree, gum trees are special. I love the way they shed their bark like snake skins. I'd never seen that before I came to Oz. English trees just lose their leaves. Australia is unique. Did you find a place on your travels that you fell in love with?

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  12. Brief, but I really like this. Home can be many different things... I like the description of your Australian home. Sounds both miserable and mysterious. One day, I'll visit be damned with the heat :)

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    1. Had to laugh. It can get damnably hot! Must confess I don't mind it. Mind you, where I live, the winters are cold. Lots of frost and westerly winds. No snow though, which I miss. Australia is an ancient landscape. Some parts have an almost Jurassic quality. A huge continent of contrast. Most beautiful beaches in the world. Unique. Hope you get the chance to check it out for yourself one day.

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  13. Hi Jenny. You don't sound like an alien. I could almost touch what sounded like the love you have for Australia. We certainly do have unique things here to make for different types of settings. One of my favourite stories is 'Lantana Lane' by Eleanor Dark. Great SE Queensland settings.

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    1. Hi Raelene, my kids reckon I'm an alien. I disagree. More like a changeling. Another book to add to my 'to read list'. This blog has introduced me to quite a few new authors. Thanks for dropping by for a chat.

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  14. Wow! What a beautiful metaphor capturing the special homelessness of having two homes!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it. Lovely to see you again.

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  15. I feel the prickly heat and it is certainly a contrast with the coolness of the north. Smell is very important to our memories. It's something that I can smell far away from where I grew up and it will trigger an instant memory from childhood. Thanks for sharing your impressions of a place I may never get to see.

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    1. Must agree. Scents are so evocative. The smell of Pears soap always reminds me of my grandparents. Lovely to have over to visit.

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  16. I hear similar sentiment from friends who are 'transplanted' from their native land. I find it mysterious that a human can be so attached to a piece of soil even though the conditions may be improved compared to from where he/she came from. Something injected into the DNA at birth, perhaps, by a mysterious spirit. LOL. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. The human psyche is mysterious. It's what makes people so marvelous. DNA? Possible. I do think that humans have a spiritual connection to land, but many don't realize, which is a bit sad. The Indigenous peoples of Australia still recognize and celebrate their spiritual connection to the land. It is a beautiful thing. Thanks for visiting.

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  17. I know exactly how you feel, Jenny. I, too, long for home, but then when I am there I miss the place I had just come from...

    I love the four seasons, but now it seems Spring and Fall blend into Winter and summer passes like a runaway train.

    Thank you for the LOVELY comment at my blog. It truly made my day!

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  18. Thanks for dropping by. Glad you enjoyed my wee post. Another transplant I see! Must be a writerly thing. It's been a great blog hop. Hope to see you again next round of WEP

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  19. Hi Jenny!
    Poignant reflection... filled with love and a desire to be "in two places at once"... love the tone.
    Your piece really packed a punch... left me feeling slightly melancholy... in a good way of course!

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    1. Hi Michelle, thanks for dropping by. So pleased you enjoyed the post.

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  20. Haven't been there but I've fantasized about the Australian Outback. That is what draws me to this county not the cities as much. Your description made me think I was hearing the cries of those kookaburras.

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    1. Glad you can hear the kookaburras! The Australian Outback is vast. Plan for a lengthily stay if you ever follow your fantasy. Thanks for coming by.

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  21. Oh, you did a wonderful job here. You carried me with you -- back "home", back to Australia, to the sense of inevitable alienness. I wonder if that alienness is part of what we cherish in these places we've chosen to set down roots.

    Beautiful piece, Jenny.
    Guilie @ Quiet Laughter

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    1. Hi Guilie, and thanks! What a fascinating idea you put forward. I hadn't thought about it in that context, but I think you are right. It may be that the sense of being on the outside looking in that is so transfixing. Certainly I feel it gives a unique perspective.

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  22. Hi,
    As an ExPat American living in Europe, I enjoyed reading your reflection. I too go back to visit family and friends but there is something within me that knows, I will never go back to live in the USA because I have changed.
    Shalom,
    Patricia

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  23. Hi Pat,
    Great to have you here. I think you are right, as much as we may yearn for the old country, our new country does shape our lives and views. Most of my family still live in the UK which is a strong pull. Yet I have children here who are Australian. Best of both worlds perhaps!

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